I Tried A 1950’s Makeup Tutorial | Beauty With Mi | Refinery29

I Tried A 1950’s Makeup Tutorial | Beauty With Mi | Refinery29


I’ve always looked to the 1950s as a period that was just
rife in beauty inspiration. But I will be first to admit
that I don’t actually know that much about
the make up history of the decade. So I thought what better way
to learn about it than to get my hands on actual vintage
makeup tutorials from the 1950s and do it myself. I reached out to Max Factor,
which is a beauty brand that’s been around since 1909. And so Max Factor gave me this. So this is a makeup pamphlet
from 1950 that details how to apply makeup. Before I tried the tutorial though I knew I had to bolster my
knowledge on the 1950s and what was trendy at the time. So I reached out to Gabriella
Hernandez, she’s the founder of Besame
Cosmetics which is a beauty brand that
has really taken inspiration from makeup from
the 20s 30s and 40s and 50s and adapted it for a modern
day consumer. I would love for you to like kind
of give context as to the decade itself, what makeup
meant. You had from World War II a lot
of people that could not use a lot of makeup
products because they weren’t in production
at the time because of shortages due to
the war. As the fifties rolled around,
there was all kinds of products being
produced. And now all of a sudden was
kind of like a explosion of fashion, color,
and makeup. Anything that would make
you more attractive, the more feminine the better. Because after the war the
whole idea of the whole country was make babies so that we can recoup the
people that we lost. To be kind of the perfect wife
type thing you had to look the part. If you see the dresses, they
had huge skirts, very tight waisted, pointier bras. So things that really exaggerated
the female form. And the same thing happened
with the makeup. So makeup got a lot bolder than
what it was in the 40s. It wasn’t like taboo anymore. Talking to Gabriella was really
enlightening. So I sat down with a bunch of
vintage inspired makeup and my Max Factor pamphlet and
got to work. Here are Max Factor’s Hollywood
makeup secrets. So let’s start with foundation. Pan-stik makeup was becoming
increasingly popular. It was a cream makeup that was
designed to be easy to use and applied with
fingers. I applied my pan-stik make up
exactly how the directions called for. I applied light strokes my
forehead nose cheeks chin and used it very, very sparingly. With your fingertips, simply
smooth it upward and outward from the center of your face.
Continue until it’s blended. Okay, upward and outward. So moving on to eye makeup. The instructions for eyeshadow
is to blend a natural shade of eyeshadow from your eyelash
to your eyebrow! Wait a second. I’m gonna blend kind of like a
mid-tone brown on my eyelid following this
application method which is from eyelash to
eyebrow. Once my base was down I
moved on to a little bit of pastel shadow inspired by my
conversation with Gabriella. Definitely saw shadows being
used and colors that were very obvious. Like a teal and a blue and you
know colors that were really bold. I decided to use a little bit of
pastel blue inspired by the illustration on the Max Factor
pamphlet. After my eyeshadow was down, I
moved on to mascara or what they call it in the pamphlet,
which is eyelash makeup. Now I actually got my hands on an
actual creme tube mascara from Besame. This mascara was really nice. It
volumized really well although I wish it came in a
waterproof formulation. But I still think it looked good. So moving on to eyebrows. Your brow gonna determine what
type of woman you were trying to play. You’re meant to follow the natural
curve of your eyebrow to the end of the brow extending
the line a trifle. If you go more pointy as it goes into your temple, kind of like a Marilyn Monroe,
that was kind of considered to be the seductive
type of you know brow. If you were more of an ingenue or innocent you would do, you know the
Audrey Hepburn ones which was more straight. So I decided to go with a bit of
a sultry vibe today. The last step in the eyes is
eyeliner. I took a little bit of this Ben Nye
cake liner dipped it in a bit of water and drew
a small cat eye above my upper lash line. To do the kind of the doe eyed
kind of winged look on the eyeliner
came in during the 50s Once my cat I was on, I moved on
to the very last step of the eye makeup section. “Where the eyelash meets the
lower lid draw a fine line forming a faint shadow back of
the lashes.” This is one of my favorite vintage
makeup hacks and it creates an illusion that your
eyelashes are so big and fluffy that they cast a shadow
underneath your eye. So now that the eyes are done,
I moved on to rouge. There is an illustrative section of
this pamphlet that tells you how to rouge a
round face. That’s me. The idea is to have an oval face. In the 50s, everyone wanted an
oval face. I used the Besame Cream Rouge and apply it to my cheek and
blended downward to create the illusion that my
face is longer. Then the instruction says to
“blend the rouge toward the nose.” this apparently lessens the
highlight at the center of the face making your face appear more oval. They want doll face. Doll face. Honestly, this was a lot of blush
for me, but after kind of getting used to
the look, I really liked it. I think that the effect of pulling the
rouge down the cheek really does give the illusion of a
more oval, more lengthened face. Now that my base makeup is
completely done I moved on to powder. So taking the Besame loose powder I took the puff and blended
powder toward the center of my face. “Powder the nose last otherwise
the nose would be over powdered making it appear conspicuous.” “You must make sure your
face is completely powdered. Then when you’re done buff away
the excess powder from your skin.” Last but not least is lipstick. Now I pulled out my old
Guerlain lipstick which is the same shade that
Marilyn Monroe used to wear. “Lipstick will only adhere to a
dry lip.” There are only three types of
lips according to this pamphlet: thin lips, full lips, and
drooping lips. I think that I kind of fall in the
full lip section, so I followed those instructions. This is where things it a little weird. You’re meant to press your lips together therefore depositing some color from
the top lip down to the lower lip. You are not meant to add more
lipstick to the lower lip. Apparently having less color on the
lower lip and more color on the upper lift
will detract attention from the fullness of a lower lip. I did not know that that was a bad thing but I guess in the 50s it was. The last step was just to “moisten
lips to give them lustre.” So I took that to mean add a little
bit of clear gloss. Going into making this video, I’m
not gonna lie, I was pretty nervous. While many people look at the 1950s
as this time of American opulence, in my eyes makeup was often
used to reinforce really strict gender roles. It was actually expected at that
time to wear makeup on a daily basis. There was a lot of pressure and I’m
sure it was very hard on women to keep this up. Women of color definitely did not
have a lot of representation when it came to makeup. There
were definitely very limited selection of products, so they had to buy whatever was
available for other women. They couldn’t really find makeup
bases. The colors did not go beyond like a tan so most of the women didn’t
wear base. You know, we want to look that
way today because it’s very pretty and it’s very feminine and it’s
nostalgic. After talking to Gabriella and doing
this entire tutorial I realized that 1950s is one
small part of an entire line of makeup history. People think of makeup as this
trivial materialistic thing but makeup goes so beyond simply
what you’re putting on your face. It has historical relevance. It has
cultural significance. It has economic impact. Every decade has its own unique
makeup identity and I’m really excited to learn
more about it. It’s very evident that makeup is
truly a reflection of the times. Thanks so much for watching, guys. Let me know what you want to see
next on Beauty With Mi by commenting down below. And click here to subscribe
to Refinery29, and click here to watch another
video. Bye.

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