We Travelled to California for Old Hollywood Makeup

We Travelled to California for Old Hollywood Makeup


(peppy string music) – [Gabriela] I like the
transformative power of red lipstick. You kind of have to make
the decision to kind of jump in and put it on. You know, without red lipstick, I feel like something is missing. Like, my whole life is in black and white, my whole being is in black and white. (laughs) And I need that color. It just makes you feel more like the boss. – I love how I look in this robe. You guys, good job, lighting is great. We are in La La Land, in Hollywood. (pulsing techno music) Old Hollywood, to me,
reminds me of my grandmother. You know, she always had a
red lipstick and red nails. Any time she could, she would
just like, give you a pose. – My partner makes me
feel really glamorous. He’s always like, “(sighs) Baby, you look
absolutely gorgeous.” And I’m like, I just woke up and I haven’t brushed my teeth yet. – We are meeting Gabriela
Hernandez, from Besame Cosmetics. It is a full makeup line, basically replicating
makeup from past decades. Trying to bring back that old
Hollywood glamour, into today. – [Rachel] And I would
have never thought about the history of makeup and a historian making a cosmetic line, but it seems that she’s
created her own reality around the things that she loves. – So I’m really excited to
try on the exact lipstick hue from the like, 1930’s and feel glamorous. – These cosmetics from
a time where men ruled the makeup industry. And I like it, ’cause she’s
kinda like taking it back. – So this week we are
gonna go to a flea market, and we’re gonna go source
out some vintage makeup that she uses as inspiration, and then, Rach and I are gonna have a
full-on vintage transformation. – Stepping into the past is
a little different for me. I have to do it in my own way. For me, I’m going all Josephine Baker. – [Jess] I love the name
of her beauty company, it’s one of my mom’s favorite boleros. Besame, besame mucho means
kiss me, kiss me generously, kiss me as much as you possibly can, because I love you and
because I love myself. – Alright. I am done. White, would you like
the white dress, honey? That’s how my grandma speaks, spoke. (cool rap music) ♪ We got that top ment’ attitude ♪ ♪ What we rockin’, costume jewels ♪ ♪ Never step out without the GL’s ♪ ♪ So we step in designer shoes ♪ ♪ Service is better than speed rail ♪ ♪ When we rolling and
talking bout bulk kale ♪ ♪ Don’t fuck with cares,
gotta save the cash ♪ ♪ For the mama we’re
hittin’ the snow trail ♪ ♪ I got four boys and they all poised ♪ ♪ To be wantin’ me like ♪ – Whole Crow family’s in the car. (mimics trumpet) – That one is so cute.
– It’s so cute! Isn’t it? Look at the perf, it actually
looks like a little fan. That’s adorable. It has nothing in it,
so it’s no good for me. You do that, I’m getting both of these. – Hi!
– Hi. – I’ll take both of these
– Gabriella! – Come in.
– Hi! – How are you?
– Nice to meet you. – Nice to meet you, hi.
– Good to meet you. – Hi.
– How are you? (speaking foreign language) – I’ve found a couple
of things that I like. – You do?
– You did? – Already?
– Already? – Yeah, I bought this really cute, it has a little powder in here
and a little blush in there. Will lock and it has
your lipstick in there. – [Rachel] Oh my gosh! – [Jess] So this is where
you find your inspiration? – Yes, I look for things
that I haven’t seen before and then, if I happen to find something that has a color inside, then I can take it out and
actually analyze the color to see if it’s something we already make or it’s a new color that I don’t have. – So is it fun having a mom
that’s like super into makeup? – Yes.
– And that can give you like, all the access?
(laughing) So fun, I’m super jelly.
(laughing) You have a very like, kind of like, old Hollywood glam look to you too. – Oh, thank you.
– So pretty. – That’s my aesthetic.
– Yeah? Just how I said it? Right on, girl.
(laughing) Where were you born, Gabriela? – I was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in a very, very small town that consisted of about
four square blocks. I’m an only child, so I was kind of used
to entertaining myself. I was either playing with
my dolls or I was, you know, mixing stuff, or collect like
little bottles and things, like when my mom went to
the salon I would like, keep all the little vials and things that they would put on her hair. (laughs) – So not much has changed, good to know. – So, you’re 12 years
old, you’re in Argentina, and now you and your parents
are moved to New York. – Compared to where I was coming from, New York was really, really
gritty and a lotta creaking and noises and all kinds of
things that I wasn’t used to. We left ’cause we just didn’t
want to live there and my, my mom was terrified. So at that point, we moved to California. That’s so funny, these cameras, see they sell them as antiques and I used to actually
shoot a camera like this. – Really?
– Yes! It’s just funny that, you know,
they display it as like a, “Oh, this is so old!” I didn’t actually have an
interest in beauty as much as I had an interest in
design and photography. So I went into art direction. After a few years, I got some accounts that
had to do with beauty, that involved creating
products for other lines. So it kind of got me interested into what I personally would like,
so I started kinda doodling and doing things that I remember like, maybe my grandma had things like this. – So what was the eureka
moment when you decided, “I’m gonna try making this lipstick”? – Well, I had so much work
already into it that I thought, “Well, I’m just gonna try one.” And if it works then I can keep going, and if it doesn’t, it was
just a nice experiment, and, you know, I got to make something that I thought was really pretty. All these things started
to, to happen with it. People started finding? (laughs) I really didn’t market it at all. – It was like a little side project. – A side project. – I love how you said
that so nonchalantly like, “I got this thing, I made a
lipstick, I made a website, “I just put it up.”
(laughing) But there’s so much detail, you know, there’s so much detail
that went into that. This one.
– Oh yeah, that one! – This one’s pretty cute, yeah? – Ah, you found something, Rach! (laughs) – I’m so good at this! I think this is the original lipstick? – Yes it is.
– Really? – [Gabriela] Yeah, they
made that shade, yes. – [Rachel] Oh my gosh! – [Jess] And this is what, 70’s as well? – [Rachel] What do you think this is? – [Gabriela] Yeah, this is like late 60’s. – Made in England, like you said, there was a lot in England then, right? – Yeah, a lot, because of their brass. – You look at anything like this? – Oh yeah, look at these guys! – Wow!
– Yeah, it’s cute. – Oh, those are good, look at this one. – Isn’t it cute?
– This is cute. (chill drum n bass music) – The era that inspires me
the most is the 40’s and 50’s. – I love, love, love the 50’s so much. – Well I grew up, you know,
watching like I Love Lucy, and like Dick Van Dyke,
Bewitched, and all that stuff. – The 50’s was definitely an
elegant with the wasp waist and the full skirts, I love that. – A lot of stuff was going on, but women always found the time to make themselves feel
beautiful in their own ways. – I really love history, there’s something I love
about each and every decade. I’m gonna probably stop at the 70’s. – One of my favorite style
icons is Carmen Miranda. – Any film that is black and white that I’ve ever seen will inspire me. – I feel most glamorous
when my shoulders are back, I have that pan and that great
dress and that red lip on. – Makes me happy inside. ‘Cause I’m wearin’ the colors that I like, the shapes that I like. I like the feeling of the rayon. – [Rachel] Ow, oh, oh, oh, okay. Work it mami, work it mami, work it mami, in the heels, oh my
goodness, that’s a may. (chill jazz music) – So cute!
– Oh my god. – You look fabulous!
– Oh, thank you, thank you. You guys do too, look at you. So I have a lot of goodies here. – [Rachel] Yeah, interesting stuff. Here, Jess, ready?
– Yeah. (moaning) – [Gabriela] So you see,
I kind of put it out and I can see the, the shade, I can see like the undertone of the shade. And then see if it kinda fits in or if it’s too close to
something we already have. So I do this with all of the colors. – [Rachel] I love that you’re
so dedicated to authenticity. – [Gabriela] It’s important to me to know kinda what people did and what
people liked before because, there must’ve been a reason
why these colors were popular and people haven’t changed
that much, so if they actually worked for a lot of people
before, they probably will again. – I actually feel like I’ve
been transported back into time when I talk or just listen to Gabriela. – I see.
– Mhm, I almost feel like she
floats instead of walks. But then you talk to her
and you’re like, “Whoa.” – Powerhouse!
– Yes. Were people telling you like, “You’re crazy, you’re making a mistake?” – (laughs) Yeah, just
like, “Do something else, “this doesn’t, this isn’t gonna sell. “It’s too niche, you know,
it’s just not marketable.” It’s definitely more of a passion thing and more of a personal project than something that I
thought had mass appeal, so. And that’s one of the reasons it was hard to get somebody to make it for me because they didn’t see
a mass appeal either. – [Jess] At what point during
the century did you see an influx of women running
cosmetic or beauty businesses? – I think it started like in the 80’s, when Sephora first came here and there were a lot of
indie brands in Sephora, and a lot of these brands were brands that were started by women. – So from the 1900, from
the turn of the century to the nine, to 1980, mainly men?
– There were a few women, but unfortunately most of the women ended up losing their businesses to men. – Wow.
– In really sad ways, too. Because when something
started to make money, the men would want it back. And so they would get rid of the women, and a lot of times it was very popular to declare somebody insane
and take over their biz. – Yeah, so, what–
– In my castle today, I have some red lipstick here. This is Cherry. Medium to dark skin tones
really do really well with this. Lighter skin tones, it’s
a little bit more gothic. – How can I just drench
and dip my whole body and then come out as a
beautiful cherry red? – [Gabriela] So basically,
you just take the mold and you would pour it in like this. See, it starts to already get solid. Open the mold.
– Oh, wow! – Play around with it.
– So cool. – I really wanna try some on.
– Okay. – Yeah?
– Sure. Do you like dark, dark colors
or you like more brights? – It’s a little chilly outside,
so maybe like a darker tone? – Lemme try, this one is
Merlot, so try that one. Merlot is kind of a
middle-of-the-road color, something more subdued that
people would use for work. Tango’s kind of interesting, it’s kind of one of those
oranges that I told you that was kind of in in the 30’s because the orange blossoms
and things like that. Victory Red is a color
that was made in 1941 to go with the uniform women
in service were wearing. – So when did makeup become
more acceptable to wear? – As women went more and
more into the workforce and became more independent
and, and had jobs, they started to wear a
little bit of makeup, like a lipstick or, you know, some powder. They kind of used it to
get ahead in their job, because the nicer you looked, of course you would get promotions. It was part of the way of moving up. – Also what I find really
fascinating about her lipsticks is that each color is
associated to a year that it was kind of like, popular in.
– Yeah, so cool. – When you’re in that space
of putting on your lipstick in the morning and having
that ritual with yourself, other women like you have
worn this red in the past, women who have like, wanted
to take the time to just like, put on lipstick and feel good. – You haven’t done me yet. – Okay, so.
– I’m closing my eyes, you just have to pick.
(laughing) I’ll leave my lips exposed. – I would go with Red Velvet. It’s a really nice kinda serious red. – That’s perfect for me, I’m very serious. – Very serious.
– About life. Who were some of your
first customers, then? – [Gabriela] I think people
that like that lifestyle, vintage enthusiasts or
even history enthusiasts. Now we have a variety of
customers, police detectives, one is a rocket scientist,
and another one is a mechanic for the Air Force and a lot
of really interesting women. They’re very receptive to
knowing exactly what I’m doing and these ladies really want
detail, they want the meat. (cool techno music) – I don’t think that I
was born in the wrong era, I was born just the right time. – Okay, first of all, just
because I’m wearing an outfit from the 1930’s, 40’s, 50’s, or 60’s, doesn’t mean I reflect those values. – I feel like I’m a representation of a lot of women from
that era who didn’t get some of the opportunities that
I get just in everyday life. – Even today we’re still
struggling with it, but it doesn’t mean
that you don’t celebrate everything that women are,
we’ve always been mothers, we’ve always been pioneers. – Within the vintage scene, women of all races are
definitely on there, but I feel like there is such a struggle, still, for us to have a window, so I’m so happy to be here today. (laughs) – I wear these clothing and I carry myself in this way to say, “Hey, you know, you may
have been able to hold back “other people, but you can’t hold me back “from wearing what I wanna
wear and being who I wanna be “and being strong in that.” – Oh, hello. Today, on Beauty Mark, Rach and I are getting
a full vintage makeover. – We’re working on our glow,
darling, our 30’s glow. Pool boy, pool boy!
– Where’s the pool boy? – [Artist] Couple of makeup
artists back in the 30’s would separate actresses’
eyelashes with a pen to get them like, very long and individual and kind of spiky lookin’.
– That’s so cool. – But think about how
long that must’ve taken. – [Rachel] Yeah, I was gonna say that, it’s like, such tedious work. – Today, Rach and I are getting a makeover by you and your fabulous team. You’re gonna be photographing us? – Yes.
– How exciting! – So I’m gonna use my old fashion cameras. (screaming) – It’s so vintage.
– We’ll bring, yeah, we’ll bring the big guns! – [Jess] How do you honor the
past without romanticizing it? Or over-romanticizing it? – [Gabriela] I try to
be very realistic about what the issues were in the past, I mean it wasn’t all rosy,
we had a lot of problems. We had a lot of products
that were toxic to the skin, toxic to women, and we
didn’t know about it. And a lot of them suffered
a lot because of this. These men that created
the Hollywood iconic looks and the way that makeups
should be applied, were very mathematical. Because they were going by
kind of standard proportion that had to do with Renaissance art. You can’t really do this, because then you’re not allowing
somebody to be themselves. Every time I think of making a new item, I have to really kind of vet it in my head that people are really
going to be able to use this and that it fits into a routine in a way that is not convoluted
and it’s not difficult, and there’s a lot of
products we don’t make because I just can’t get behind them. – You look lovely.
(laughing) – It is very subversive, what
we’re doing, yes. (laughs) – [Jess] I know, and
it’s so great, you know? Because we’re gonna be
recreating a photo shoot with everything very authentic, except that now you will have two– – Luscious, curvy, women of color! – Yes.
– Bam. – [Jess] Being photographed
by a female photographer. – [Rachel] Oh, do you think you’re ready? – Oh my goodness. Wow. (haunting piano music) – Oh, hello, Gabriela darling! Haven’t seen you in so long. – Wow. – I feel very romantic.
– So glamorous. Oh my goodness.
(laughing) (shutter clicking) Poster-worthy, there you go.
– Right up here? – [Gabriela] In kind of
like the past we can see things seem to repeat
themselves in patterns. The more that you look into it, the more that you get insight. It’s a way that you can kind of predict what’s going to happen next in the future. Let’s see if I can see being up here. – [Jess] It’s been really interesting getting to know Gabriela. She gave a lot of context to makeup. (shutter clicking) – Oh, I love it.
(laughing) It’s so cute. – Women who have come
and gone and used makeup as a tool for survival, for ascension. (laughing) (shutter clicking) – [Rachel] I’m so grateful
for the small things in life. And for the lipsticks,
and for the mascaras, and knowing that these things
that may seem frivolous connect me so deeply
to so many other women from this era and eras past. (shutter clicks) – [Gabriela] All right, and I’m done. – Thanks for watching Beauty Mark. – If you like what you
saw, subscribe for more. – (laughs) I said it!
– You did it! Okay, you’re leaving me.
– Oh, sorry! Sorry, I got really excited.

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