Why Are People Dying From Brazilian Butt Lift Surgery?

Why Are People Dying From Brazilian Butt Lift Surgery?


In their fight against their own bodies some
people seek to reverse the ageing process or enhance or reduce what they already have. The more common surgeries are removing excess
fat, enlarging the breasts, filling out the lips, reshaping the nose and rejuvenating
the face. You might not have heard of “dimpleplasty”,
adding permanent dimples to the face. Or what about “otoplasty”? This is the surgery that pulls the ears closer
to the head. For the most part such surgeries are safe,
but there is always the risk of infections, anesthesia complications, nerve damage or
scarring. Sometimes the procedure just doesn’t exactly
go to plan and the person gets something they didn’t bargain for. Today we’ll look at the darker side of getting
‘work done’, in this episode of the Infographics Show, Why People Are Dying from Brazilian
Butt Lift Surgery. First of all, for those of you not fluent
in the field of augmenting, diminishing and styling parts of the body, let’s see exactly
what butt lift surgery is. You don’t generally go into a clinic and
ask for a butt lift, it sounds rather crude. Instead, you ask for buttock enhancement. This might be reducing the size of the posterior;
it might be re-shaping the backside, making it firmer or giving it more attractive contours. It seems many people are not keen on what
nature gave them, or perhaps not enough exercise and too many soft drinks have helped create
a behind someone is far from proud of owning. When we are talking buttock augmentation much
of the time we are referring to adding more volume to the backside and giving it a better
shape. Sometimes called the “Brazilian Butt Lift”,
the procedure often involves taking a person’s own body fat and adding it to the buttocks. This usually means taking fat from what is
called a “donor area”, which is often either the love handles, the thighs or the
stomach. But it could also mean putting synthetic implants
into the backside, something that carries more risks and is very rare in the USA. What kind of people go for such a surgery? One plastic surgery website tells us these
people are worried their butt is too small, feel their butt isn’t round enough or that
one side is bigger than the other; they have an asymmetrical posterior. It’s also advised that if you opt for this
surgery that you should be in good health, not smoke, and it’s better if you’re committed
to living a healthy life. What about the cost? The American Society of Plastic Surgeons tells
us that in 2017 the average cost of a butt lift was $5,113. The average cost of butt enhancement with
fat grafting augmentation was $4,096 and the average cost of getting butt implants was
$4,884. It goes without saying that if you opt for
the cheapest butt surgery out there you might be putting yourself at risk. People are asked to check if their surgeon
is qualified, experienced and certified. In the U.S. this might be easy, but in some
other countries there might be some surgeries that don’t exactly meet U.S. standards. You’ll usually be asked to sign a consent
form to acknowledge you know what the surgery consists of and what risks there might be. For instance, there is always a risk someone
might not deal well with the anesthetic. As we write this there is news of a 72-year-old
Thai woman who apparently died after having an allergic reaction to the anesthetic in
a Bangkok plastic surgery clinic. But the list of complications of butt surgery
is a long one. These include infections, bleeding, pain,
poor healing, fat necrosis, deep vein thrombosis, cardiac and pulmonary complications, accumulation
of fluid, asymmetry of butt, numbness, scarring, skin loss and more. That’s pretty scary, so now is the right
time to tell you about when butt lift surgery went very wrong, when the complication was
the worst on the list: Death. One source tells us that Brazilian butt lift
surgeries in the U.S. have been getting more common over the past five years. It also tells us, “The American Society
of Plastic Surgeons, the Brazilian butt lift (BBL) has the highest rate of death of all
aesthetic procedures.” Why is that? We are told that injecting fat into the buttocks
is not exactly the safest of procedures. This is because the fat is injected into the
muscle, not just other fat. If it goes into the muscle it has more chance
of staying in place. But this is where the problem lies. Apparently, injecting fat into muscle can
lead to complications if not done correctly. What can happen is something called fat embolism,
which means the fat gets into the bloodstream and blocks a vessel. This could mean blocking oxygen getting to
your lungs or to the brain, and that could mean game over for the patient. But how dangerous is it really? The Aesthetic Surgery Education and Research
Foundation (ASERF) set out in 2017 to find out the answer to that. It interviewed 4,843 plastic surgeons globally
and also looked at data when possible. 692 surgeons responded to the survey and in
all reported 198,857 cases of gluteal fat grafting. ASERF wrote, “Over their careers, surgeons
reported 32 fatalities from pulmonary fat emboli as well as 103 nonfatal pulmonary fat
emboli. Three percent of respondents experienced a
patient fatality and 7% of respondents reported at least one pulmonary fat embolism in a patient
over their careers.” With the help of the Association for the Accreditation
of Ambulatory Surgical Facilities in the USA, more data was collected only relating to the
U.S. The bad news was that this data revealed that
over 5 years, 25 people in the U.S. died as a result of having that surgery. The conclusion of the research was stark:
“Despite the growing popularity of gluteal fat grafting, significantly higher mortality
rates appear to be associated with gluteal fat grafting than with any other aesthetic
surgical procedure.” Now let’s put some faces to the unsettling
news of this being a risky surgery to have. We are told that in 2016 a U.S. mother of
two died after liposuction and butt enhancement surgery went wrong. It was reported that after being injected
with fat some of the fat particles clogged her arteries and the result was her lungs
and heart failing to function. It was reported by medical examiners that
she had a heart defect, but indeed fat particles had entered her bloodstream. Only recently in Brazil, perhaps the home
of the Brazilian butt lift, a doctor who went by the name of ‘Dr Bumbum’ was charged with
murder after a surgery didn’t go to plan. He’d actually done the procedure not in
a clinic but in his apartment, reported The Guardian newspaper. A woman, aged 46, died just hours after having
the surgery. Not only was the doctor charged with homicide,
but also his domestic employee, his girlfriend, mother, his girlfriend and his secretary. The doctor was popular, too, with 600,000
followers on Instagram and 44,000 on Facebook. He’d use those platforms to post before
and after photos, when of course things turned out good. In the case of the dead woman, he’d used
a substance called Poly (methyl methacrylate), or PMMA as a filler, although the Brazilian
Plastic Surgery Society has issued warnings about using this. Only a week before we write this, the BBC
reported that a second British woman had died in 2018 after getting the butt surgery. It writes that in spite of the British Association
of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons saying this is one risky surgery, it is celebrities that
have made it popular. A doctor talking to the BBC estimated that
about one in 3,000 people die when receiving this treatment, which according to the website
Injury Facts, is about the same odds a person has of choking to death on food in their lifetime. The first of the deaths of the British women
receiving butt lift surgery in 2018 happened in Turkey. The beautician from Leeds in the north of
England had travelled to a place that apparently had celebrity clientele. She paid around $3,900 for the procedure. The mother of three didn’t make it home
and according to her partner he was still waiting for answers as to how exactly she
died. Not much was said about the second British
woman, only that she was in her 20s and that an investigation was ongoing. So, let’s say you are not one of the people
that died. Does it mean you are home-free? Not according to reports. There might be significant trauma to come. In 2018, a 23-year-old woman from Wales said
she had also skipped over to Turkey to get her butt done. She didn’t die, but said months after the
surgery holes had formed in her backside and it was leaking. “I couldn’t walk properly for ages,” she
told the BBC, adding that the leaking fat would make a mess of her clothes. She said it smelled bad and she had to bandage
her butt all the time. “I honestly wish I could go back. I was happy with my body before. And now I paid a stupid amount of money to
look like this,” she told the BBC. Another woman also came forward saying she
had gone over to Turkey for the same surgery as it was cheap over there. She ended up with a high fever when she got
home and the surgeon in Turkey she said stopped replying to her emails and text messages. She then had to be admitted to a hospital
and two years later still had pains in her backside. If you want to give yourself a shock just
look at pictures online of when butt lift surgery, often with implants, turned bad. Not only is the butt a mess with holes all
over it, but some of those photos look monstrous, as if the butts were fashioned with Plasticine
by a kid that was very bad at modelling. It is unfortunate that some people are so
insecure of their behind that they take such a risk. Perhaps we are not all born to be able to
take the perfect “Belfie”. A Consultant Plastic and Cosmetic Surgeon
at The Plastic Surgery Group told the British media that there are sometimes complications
but often the surgeons just get it wrong. He said if you must get it, avoid fillers
and choose your surgeon wisely. If you don’t choose wisely you could end
up looking much worse than before and as you know, you could die. Never go for the cheap option. After hearing this, would you be up for some
butt enhancement surgery? Do you think it’s as risky as it seems,
or do you think the media has blown this out of proportion? Tell us in the comments. Also, be sure to check out our other show
Most Painful Things A Person Can Experience. Thanks for watching, and as always, please
don’t forget to like, share and subscribe. See you next time.

100 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *